WHAT IS DIVINE MERCY SUNDAY?

The late Pope John Paul II instituted the observance of Divine Mercy Sunday—which is based on the visions of St. Faustina Kowalska, who was a member of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy—on the first Sunday after Easter.

Catholics are encouraged to go to confession and receive the Eucharist on Divine Mercy Sunday in order to obtain a plenary indulgence connected to the feast.

HOW CAN WE BE MERCIFUL?

We are not only to receive the mercy of God, but to use it by being merciful to others through our actions, our words, and our prayers; in other words, we are to practice the Corporal and Spiritual Works (Acts) of Mercy.

The Lord wants us to do these works of mercy, because even the strongest faith is of no use without works.

Jesus' Call to Mercy

"I demand from you deeds of mercy, which are to arise out of love for Me. You are to show mercy to your neighbors always and everywhere. You must not shrink from this or try to excuse or absolve yourself from it.

I am giving you three ways of exercising mercy toward your neighbor:
the first — by deed, the second — by word, the third — by prayer. In these three degrees is contained the fullness of mercy, and it is an unquestionable proof of love for Me. By this means a soul glorifies and pays reverence to My mercy.

Many souls ... are often worried because they do not have the material means with which to carry out an act of mercy. Yet spiritual mercy, which requires neither permissions nor storehouses, is much more meritorious and is within the grasp of every soul.

If a soul does not exercise mercy somehow or other, it will not obtain My mercy on the day of judgment. Oh, if only souls knew how to gather eternal treasure for themselves, they would not be judged, for they would forestall My judgment with their mercy" (1317).

The Divine Mercy Chapel at St. Michael the Archangel Church


The only Divine Mercy Chapel in Indianapolis is located at 3356 W. 30th St., right next to St. Michael the Archangel Church.  Adorers are scheduled every hour of every day to pray for the sick, the dying and the unborn.